Arresting a Ship

 

Harbours, Docks, and Piers Clauses Act 1847

Having been a bailiff for over 25 years I have been involved in some interesting cases but until this year I have never arrested a Ship. This year Enforcement Bailiffs has been involved in two.

Arresting a Ship

The Tribunal courts and Enforcement Act abolished most forms of distress. There were however a few exceptions. One of these comes under the Harbours, Docks, and Piers Clauses Act 1847.

Chapter 27 section 45 of the Harbours, Docks, and Piers Clauses Act 1847 gives the Port authority the right to use distress if harbour rates and fees are not paid.

The arrestment of a ship is usually made by attaching a notice of arrestment / distress to the mast of the ship. If the debtor does not discharge the debt then the goods on the ship or indeed the ship itself may be sold to recover sums due.

This is similar to distress for rent that used to be available for landlords. It is a great tool for quickly recovering sums due to a Port or Harbour authority.

In my latest case we were able to arrest the ship early one morning before it left the dock and evaded paying the fees.

In the latest case undertaken by Enforcement Bailiffs we were able to arrest the ship early one morning before it left the dock and evaded paying the harbour fees. The owner of the ship had no choice but to find the money and pay the fees so they could move their cargo.

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Enforcement Bailiffs Ltd has over twenty five years experience in the execution of warrants and collection of commercial debt.

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